Fatally-Yours. “Miss Randall” interview

Miss Randall “Women in Horror Month” interview via Fatally Yours

Miss Randall, photo by Gene Kirkland

Interview by Sarah “Fatally Yours” Jahier

This interview is part of Fatally-Yours’ Women in Horror interview series. We’ll be featuring interviews with women in the horror industry the whole month of February! Read more about Women in Horror Month here!

Miss Randall (born Julieta Randall on November 25, 1983 in Mexico City, Mexico) is an American drummer, vocalist and audio engineer.

A percussive and rhythmic person – always interested in Prog Rock and Metal at an early age – she bought her first drum kit at the age of 18, determined to teach herself how to play drums. Hard work demonstrated an innate talent and after 6 months of picking up the drum sticks, she joined the Mexican/American band Rusty Eye.

Playing live and recording Rusty Eye demos triggered in her an interest in Music Production, attending Music College in 2003. During this same year, she learned how to incorporate singing while drumming.

In 2004 she opted to continue Recording Engineering studies in Hollywood, CA as well as relocating the band to this city.

Self-produced releases include: Cryogenic EP, Stendhal Syndrome, Live at the Joint MMVI, and most recently, Possessor which features music collaborations with: acclaimed Italian film composer Claudio Simonetti (Goblin), guitarist/producer Waldemar Sorychta (Grip Inc.) and Alex Mitchell (Circus of Power).

Miss Randall was among the World’s Fastest Drummer finalists in 2007 (feet category) scoring 720 hits in 60 seconds.

Fatally Yours: How long have you been drumming and singing? Do you play any other instruments?

Miss Randall: I’ve always been into singing. I played in a few professional plays as a kid, mostly musicals, and that got me acquainted with the thrill of being onstage. Years later after quitting theater, the motivation for performing came back but I thought that I needed an instrument to tag along with me. So I bought my first drum kit 7 years ago, joined Rusty Eye 6 months later (I was not fooling around!). I play a bit of piano just to put my ideas down and to make the guides of songs that we record.

Miss Randall, photo by Gonzalo SandovalFatally Yours: When did you become interested in pursuing music as a career?

Miss Randall: I always wanted to do music, but in the beginning it was a hobby. I started to take it seriously when I graduated high school and firmly decided that I had to move to L.A. in order to study Audio Engineering and rock that city with my band too. Before I moved out of Mexico City, I attended a music school for about a year, and that was of great help.

Fatally Yours: What has it been like as a female in the male-dominated metal genre?

Miss Randall: I get that question a lot! As of now, I’ve learned to just do my thing, carrying myself as a professional musician and not thinking about me being in a male-dominated environment (it can get to your head and besides, I’m not a feminist).

I honestly work better with guys, maybe because they appear to me to be a bit more dedicated and serious. I’m not saying that there are not dedicated women out there, but I just know what works for me.

Fatally Yours: Have you had any experiences where people took you less seriously as a musician because of your gender?

Miss Randall: Happens all the time in recording sessions, loading up gear, doing sound check at clubs, going to shows, and introducing myself to people… I always have to prove myself more than a guy would have to. That is the reality of it. I bugs, yes, but I won’t let that put me down or sad.

Fatally Yours: Why do you think it’s hard for some people to accept that women can love metal music and horror movies?

Miss Randall: Well, I think that deep in their minds they that we go to the extreme of showing our interest for Horror and Metal as an escape to our problems or just to get attention. At least that’s what people tell me who are not aware of what goes on in the Horror/Metal world. I think that the nature of both genres demands a bit more intellect, openness, and understanding. Not everything is to be taken literally either, could be an outside tale told from another hypothetical person. Or sometimes it could be something personal: an internal feeling sublimed in a song. Either way, both sides are positive. Creating is a positive thing and not everything is supposed to be pretty, but then again: who said that the ugly cannot be considered beautiful too?

Fatally Yours: Have you noticed more women getting into metal, whether they are musicians or fans?

Miss Randall: Yeah that’s really cool, I’m glad this is happening.

Fatally Yours: Do you think perceptions of women in mainly male-dominated industries are changing? If so, how and why are women’s roles changing?

Miss Randall: I guess that in the end, when we stop questioning the role men and women have in society, we can finally reach the equal rights we are looking for.

Miss RandallFatally Yours: What has been your best concert and/or tour experience? Your worst?

Miss Randall: A great show experience was when we played with Katatonia and Moonspell; we caught the attention of a film director in the audience who later filmed “Mr. Cannibal” for us, sponsored/directed by him and it came out pretty professional. As for bad experiences, I think all shows have had a positive outcome, which immediately neutralizes any difficulties inside my head.

Fatally Yours: Who are your favorite female metal vocalists and musicians?

Miss Randall: Anneke from The Gathering (the early stuff), Liv Kristine when in Theater of Tragedy, Doro, Lita Ford, and I guess that’s pretty much it.

Fatally Yours: What are your top five albums?

Miss Randall: Morningrise by Opeth, Dark Side of the Moon by Floyd, Red by King Crimson, Melissa by Mercyful Fate, Seventeen Seconds by The Cure.

Fatally Yours: What musicians have inspired/influenced you the most?

Miss Randall: Stewart Copeland [The Police], Neil Peart [Rush], Lars Ulrich [Metallica], Mikael Åkerfeldt [Opeth], Beth Gibbons [Portishead], Mikkey Dee [Motörhead], Danny Carey [Tool], Jim Morrison [The Doors], David Gilmour [Pink Floyd], Robert Fripp [King Crimson] and Claudio Simonetti [Goblin].

Fatally Yours: A lot of your songs are named after and about horror films. What inspired your band to do this?

Miss Randall: The cinematic properties our music is undeniable, thank you for noticing that! It must be the amount of movies we’ve seen, their scores, and also listening to King Diamond and Mercyful Fate quite a lot!

Miss Randall, photo by Gene KirklandFatally Yours: When and how did you fall in love with the horror genre?

Miss Randall: Definitely the first time I saw Nightmare on Elm Street and Poltergeist. I’ve always enjoyed the thrill of getting scared.

Fatally Yours: What are your favorite horror films?

Miss Randall: Inferno, Suspiria, Tenebrae, Deep Red, The Exorcist, The Entity, Zombi 2, The Beyond, From Beyond, Poltergeist. Texas Chainsaw Massacre, To the Devil a Daughter, The Abominable Dr. Phibes, Hellraiser, Deathdream, Reanimator, Anthropophagus… and so many more.

Fatally Yours: What goals do you hope to accomplish in your life?

Miss Randall: Just keep immersing in different fields of artistic expression, perhaps film at a later point. I’d love to score a film one day too and to start producing/engineering other bands that have something interesting to say.